Sunday, 3 November 2013

The ARCHITECTURE of BELIEF

A busy half term week started with collecting my daughter from the West Midlands and ended with putting up an exhibition of my Dad's artwork in Cambridge.



We arrived at St Michael's Church, Trinity St, Cambridge, on Thursday 31 October at 4.15 pm. To reach the Chancel, we passed through the very nice Michaelhouse Café.







The Chancel side walls are lined with curtains hanging from pelmets and this is where the exhibition had to be hung from.  The pelmets are about 9 feet from the floor of the seating and access with a ladder is complicated by the proximity of the pews:



However, we managed to position the ladder at an angle - even though it felt almost vertical when standing near the top! By about 7 pm all but one of the paintings was hanging. This was due to the curtains on the left wall being longer then those on the right wall, since the last arch on the right was only half an arch to accommodate a through-way to another area of the building. This meant we had to move some of the paintings along and place another in an area with no pelmet:




(You can see the painting on the right in the area it has to be hung).


The next afternoon, we arrived at 4.30 pm to put up the last painting and adjust the spacing between everything. An extra spar of wood had to be used to bridge the gap, since there was no other way to secure the wire fixings:



This is the main synopsis for the exhibition:


"Everyone believes in something, however practical or abstract. At the centre must be "The Architecture of Belief" we have in SELF. Imparted in family; embedded in community; developed by groups and associations; sharpened and made more inwardly and deeply personal by individual thought, experience, reading and reflection. This belief can lead to striving beyond limitations; extending physically and imaginatively our lives and way of life or the opposite, withdrawing and defending what we believe and how we live.

Across this broad spectrum we can witness and have placed before us instances and images of human activity across our planet. This kind of broad view, however partial, can help us recognise that there, somewhere, but for the chance of being where we are, we could have been conscripted, regimented, deprived, abandoned, to any of the other conditions of life we are shown that are not ours. Any overview, however simplistic and 'detached', should induce feelings of compassion, wonder, sadness but also hope; even as we are not placed in dire positions to defend our belief but want peace of some sort for those who have to defend theirs.

Each of the twelve images evoke aspects of humans conducting their affairs and the hope that belief in the diversity and range of human life can release its spirit rather than kill it." - Keith Gentle 2013

The exhibition will be visible to the public from now until the end of November 2013:

St Michael's Church, Trinity St, Cambridge CB2 1SU

Phone: +44 1223 309147

Hours: Closed on Sunday




Wednesday, 18 September 2013

Felt Up The Wrong Way!

Last Sunday, the weather produced a small gale where I live - the result being that on Monday morning, I noticed the felt from my shed roof folded in a neat heap on the ground next to it. A year previous, the wind had lifted one length of the felt and left it dangling down the length of the long side of the shed. As the felt was mostly intact, I managed to flip it back over the roof and make a reasonable repair with some more felt nails and a couple of wooden strips. However, after inspecting the latest damage I discovered about a quarter of the felt now missing and it was obvious from other tears and gaps that the only solution, to save the contents of the shed from rain damage, would be to re-felt the lot!

I managed to find a place to buy felt in Wakefield, together with more felt nails and some bitumen-type sealer for the felt overlap areas. Despite having had rain showers on and off for most of the morning, a gap in the weather allowed me to complete the re-fit in just over an hour in warm sunshine. After completing the felting, I realised that only one of my original edging fascia boards was free of rot. The two ends were well past being reusable.





In the past, I have always bought my wood locally at the Timbernest in Clayton West. Sadly, the last time I went it was closed for a week, and a couple of weeks after that, it looked like this!


In the end, I remembered Ernshaw's Timber (even more local to me) and they had the wood I needed for about £3. I added two new ends and a further strip along the back:

As soon as I'd finished, it started to rain. The only thing left to do, was paint the ends to match the rest of the shed colour.







Work complete (between rain showers), it should last the winter now - and hopefully, several more years. 








The garden area has continued to flourish and it's now a nice place to sit out.



Monday, 12 August 2013

Garden Plants and Classic Cars

August is one of the busiest months for me - mainly due to it being the school summer holiday for my daughter... which in turn means complying with numerous requests for various activities... not to mention her birthday in the same month!

Anyway, I managed to complete the patio seating area and a local gardener helped by supplying several plants at little cost.


(With bubbles)

We attended both Woolley Horse Show and Emley Show - taking numerous photos we will probably never do much with... Here are a couple:


No one that I know, but the goat was delighted (Emley)

Some of you may be mistaken in thinking that the focus of my attention and the main event here (at Woolley) is the horse and rider...

...but actually, the horse was in the way on that previous shot:


I've always liked that commentary box - it would make a great motorhome / travelling workshop. For much of the year it is parked not far from where I live and I often drive past it.

More to my liking was the Gala and Classic Car event at Barnsley's Locke Park:


I've not been to the Locke Park event before and previously have had my classic 'fix' by going to the Thornes Park event in Wakefield.  However, this year they got the date wrong - changed it twice and I ended up missing it!

Here's a small sample of some of the Locke Park vehicles:









Sunday, 21 July 2013

Sun, Seats and Sangria... well, almost

I've spent the last few days making a patio garden/seating area.  I recently discovered that the end of my house is a real sun-trap and after my friend Helen gave me a couple of chairs, I thought it really needed 'beautifying'.  Eventually, I bought a couple of rolls of fence material and then wondered where I could get some wood from.  In the end, I discovered the perfect solution. All the wood is reclaimed and was given to me by my farmer friend Rob and another friend, Lynette.  When I drove home after my wood collecting, the Jeep was crammed to the roof - I actually wondered if I'd ended up with too much!

After removing nails and sawing off rough edges, I had to buy some screws (since I couldn't remember where I'd put the ones I had from a few years back).  Once I had screws and tools sorted out, I started by making a few planters.  They had to be free-standing and durable enough to take the weight of soil and plants... and not get blown over on windy days.  A further complication was the multidirectional sloping of the paving. All the legs had to be cut to different lengths for everything to appear level.



I wanted to have different levels to add interest and an arrangement that would give a cosy, private and enclosed feel.  Another friend donated a little 'Turkey Oak' tree (shown left).

With the last of the wood, I decided to make a personal chair...


Notice the folding drinks table on the arm

The shaped back spars were originally used to keep clay drainage pipes apart when stacked. After doing a sketch to show my friend George, he said it reminded him of an Adirondack chair design.  (I'd never heard of them, but a web search brings up loads). Here's another view of the layout:


Amazingly, I ended up with exactly the right amount of wood for the whole project.  All I had left at the end was one small bin bag of sawn-off rough bits - which my neighbour said he would take for kindling to light a steam traction engine's boiler.

So... Time to think about the next phase...

I have a cunning plan...

Wednesday, 17 July 2013

The Art of Allowing

It's been an interesting few days - but they almost didn't happen!  

I finally gave up using Hotmail after 18 years after the version of Outlook provided ground to a stop and several times I couldn't access my account.  I'd put in a 'forward' to another of my accounts, expecting everything to come through.  However, when I went to check my Hotmail, the spam folder was unusually full and some items hadn't been forwarded.  Given that I had 465 items to go through, I wondered about simply emptying the whole lot.  However, I knew there were a few things I diverted there and occasionally viewed, so I started going through them.  On the third of four pages, I suddenly noticed a message from my author contact form:

Comment or enquiry: Would like to talk to you about your books. I am a radio talk show host on the Law of Attraction Radio Network.

Sometimes when I receive messages through my websites, it's people simply wanting to increase my search ratings or offer some service I don't require.  However, when I get something like the above, I go and check it out.  I arrived at Fulfilling Your Purpose and found the Law of Attraction Radio Network talk show page.  The first person I recognised was Jack Canfield (from "The Secret" film and author of "Chicken Soup for the Soul")  which certainly added credibility.  I then replied to the host, Constance Arnold, and apologised for my late reply - since her initial contact had been made a week previous and I usually reply to people on the same day as receiving messages.

Constance Arnold

We arranged an initial Skype video chat and got on really well.  Constance informed me that she "has millions of regular listeners" and people who contact her requesting to go on her show - but in my case, she had simply come across my author site through her own searching and she liked what she found on 'law of attraction' - a topic her listeners are most interested in.

We talked for about 45 minutes and arranged to do a proper interview for the show this weekend - which could go out live either Sunday 21 or 28 July at 7:00 EST (4:00 PST - 12:00 GMT).

Interestingly, what I forgot to mention to Constance, was how 'law of attraction' had brought us together from my perspective.  As mentioned in a previous blog, I had spent the last 30 years of my life practising invisibility - not wanting to draw attention to myself in any way.  However, since developing my writing full-time, being invisible hasn't helped people to find my books!  After almost a year's effort in self-promotion, followed by some thoughtful consideration, I decided that conventional methods to regain visibility were falling short of expectation and when I really thought about it, I'd need a very expansive and potentially costly, marketing campaign to get anywhere near started!  At this point, I decided to hand over the task to the universe, along the lines of: 

"I need to stop being invisible; I need people to know I exist.  Please help me to attract the right people who will be interested in my books and help me to become more noticed."

Following my own practice with 'law of attraction', I then removed myself from 'interfering' in the process or outcome, made a coffee and sat in the sun for a while.  Over the next days, I relaxed and let go of concerning myself with publicity and potential wealth generation, since I finally admitted the truth to myself:  

"Cold marketing is not something that comes naturally to you; you don't have to be good at everything; and you don't have to kill yourself with strenuous effort to "make" yourself good at something if it really doesn't interest you!"





Sunday, 30 June 2013

Crystal Healing Wands

Yesterday, I bought some more leather for wand making:


Crystal Wands

I started making wands in the early 1980s and wrote a booklet about how to make and use them:



Crystal Wand Healing book

I began experimenting with healing in 1981 after combining breathing and 'Chi' energy techniques from my practice of Kung-Fu with information I had started to gather on healing and crystals.  Throughout the 80's, I attended talks and workshops relating to healing, including a weekend workshop with healer, Matthew Manning when he visited Newcastle.  (Matthew was in some ways the English Uri Geller - but devoting his abilities to healing).  The information Matthew shared on healing was very much inline with my own philosophy at the time and it was good to know that I was having parallel thoughts on how healing could be most effective.

In 2006, I published the book shown above.  By that time, I had already fine-tuned my own technique and received positive feedback from a number of friends and clients - many of whom commissioned their own wands.

Each wand takes me between 1 and 2 hours to make, depending on the time taken for preparation of materials and setting up of work space.  The wands are then programmed for general healing use, activated and tested.  (Individuals who buy or make their own wands are encouraged to program (or reprogram) them as described in the book).


The healing wands have some interesting properties.  In addition to speeding up the natural healing process, they are particularly good at:

  • alleviating rheumatic pains 
  • ending bone aches (my term to describe what feels like a persistent ache inside a bone)
  • preventing raw blisters after receiving burns
  • preventing the development and/or spread of infection - acting as an antiseptic
  • quickly reducing many injury pains

The wands may appear to be rather plain-looking, but it is important in their design that they are kept simple.  Users are free to embellish their wands on the outside (if they really want to), but should leave an area untouched where they intend to hold or grip the wand.  The regular wand shaft is 12 inches in length with a diameter of approximately 1 inch.  Variations on this are available, but for most purposes, these are the preferred optimum dimensions.

You can read more at Richard Gentle and Hand of Light.



 







Saturday, 29 June 2013

An evening of conversation with Yinka Shonibare MBE

Over the past couple of weeks, I've attended a number of talks.   Sunday 16 June - a talk on Tom Hudson (influential Art Teacher and Artist during the 60s and 70s) arranged by the National Arts Education Archive at the YSP; Sunday 23 June - a talk by artist Miro's grandson, Joan Punyet Miró  about Miro's life and most influential works.  Joan was an excellent speaker who brought new understanding and clarity to Miro's work; and then on Thursday 27 - a conversational talk with Yinka Shonibare MBE in the YSP's Visitor Centre restaurant.

Previously, (Friday 1 March 2013) My friend Helen and I attended the private View of Yinka's exhibition, Fabric-ation:


My friend Helen with Yinka in the background

As a 'Friend' of YSP, I get invitations to events and Private Views and Helen is often my 'plus 1'.


I had never come across Yinka before, but I liked his work, its incredible richness of multicolour and its quality of production.  My first impression, looking at the exhibition, was one of two messages: quizzical enjoyment and playfulness; and an underlying current of subversive darkness.  The work, much of it based around Middle Class Colonialism, was easy for me to identify with, coming as I do from a similar MC background - a background of pretension and lies wrapped in a veil of unquestioning social acceptability.

Here is a flavour of Yinka's work.  (One of the good things about Private Views, is the allowance of public photography in the gallery areas:


Yours truly standing next to 'Earth' - coincidentally, the Astrological sign of my father.
    
Clare Lilley (Curator of YSP) interviewed Yinka in front of a paying audience of about 100 or so people.  Peter Murray (Director of YSP) was also, and unusually, in the audience.  At previous events he has always introduced the speakers with an opening talk of his own.

Yinka's social background is not unlike my own and I think for this reason, I saw aspects of his life mirrored back at me through his conversational comments and amusing asides as he navigated the proceedings like a tightrope walker balancing between authentic rebel and respectable socialite.  Sometimes appearing quite materialistic and selfish, but underlying this, tremendous insight and wisdom, rarely witnessed in a public arena outside of a 'mind, body, spirit' convention.  I wondered how much of this glimpse into the understanding of human nature anyone else was appreciating.  The open audience Q&A session at the end qualified my thoughts: many seemed confused.  I wish I had written down what he said - not because it was new to me, but because it was one of the best descriptions of personal power versus victimhood that I had heard in a long time.  Essentially, it was a version of 'turning the other cheek'; calmness in the midst of conflict; mindfulness applied in daily life situations; reclaiming personal power in adversity.

So cheers, Yinka - here's to you!






Monday, 10 June 2013

Education - Who Needs It?

A chunk of my life (between 1984 and 2012) has somehow always been connected with educational environments - whether working for the Yorkshire Sculpture Park as Information Officer and later, Archivist and Photographer; being an audio-visual technician in the education faculty at Bretton Hall (when it was a College); teaching on supply in schools in West Yorkshire; working as an Instructor at Bedford College; developing e-learning at Cranfield University; and more recently, working as an e-Learning Manager for Kirklees Council's Learning Service.

So then I get a notification mailing from LinkedIn, offering up groups that may interest me.  Quite often, I think twice about joining groups - particularly education-related ones, since I feel I am [at the time of writing this] no longer directly involved with schools and colleges - these days preferring to focus on my writing.  Having said this, I continue to run a resource site for schools and colleges: eLearning Central. The problem (figuratively speaking) is that I'm not sure, despite a strong underlying interest, whether I really want to be involved anymore!  So then I look at the groups and I can't stop myself from joining them all... then I see a thread title that draws me in further... and the next thing I know, I'm chatting on Skype with someone with a similar educational philosophy to my own... he mentions some other people... I add him and some other links to my website for other people to access... and then I email a woman who has been mentioned, Tracy Hanson (Founder of Next Generation Global Education) and switch off the computer for the night.  She's emailed me back by the morning and suggests Skyping - at which point I'm thinking: "I don't know what I can say about anything!" and "I don't know if I want to get involved in education stuff again." I looked at a video link she sent:



A couple of hours later, and we are chatting over Skype and it's evident we share a lot of similar views on education.  Tracy (based in America) has also been working with a teacher and his school (based in Nairobi).  Next thing I know (after about 2 hours chatting already) I'm invited to join her 'now due' lesson.  So suddenly, there we all are and I'm viewing quite a dark image of a little classroom in what is described on their own website as being:

The Cheery Children Education Centre (CCEC), located in the heart of Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya at Mashimoni.

I'm introduced to the class and among a few intermittent technical problems, a short lesson takes place, ending with the children singing a number song.

Here's a visible image taken from their website:




It's now that I am brought face-to-face with who needs education. They have one laptop, plus  initial financial help setting up an Internet connection, courtesy of Tracy Hanson.

There is an obvious need for resources and when Tracy asked if they could access a ball of yarn or some string for a project idea based around a spider, none was available.  They also really needed some more laptops, or at least a projector so that everyone could see Tracy's lesson more clearly. Of course, they needed quite a few things more basic than laptops, but you have to start with what is around or can be found.  Feel like helping?

The children like singing and dancing and the school sent me this link:


 







Friday, 7 June 2013

My Old School


My first childhood recollection of school was of Jesus being put to death by crucifixion on a green hill far away without a city wall. Hardly surprising when you appreciate I was here:



Yesterday, I rediscovered the website of that first Primary School and looked through the various slide show galleries.  What held me most, were the external images of the building and the interior shots of the main hall. Notice the height from ground level of most of the windows - that no 5 to 9 year old could ever hope to see into or out of. The surrounding exterior of the school has changed quite a bit since I was there (between 1968 and 1972) but the main brick buildings remain largely unchanged. When I was a child, the part of the building shown below was for class one (left two arched windows) and class two (right two arched windows): 


Ignoring the pupils, the floor has not changed - albeit much lighter than it used to be: 


The PE aparatus (back wall) is new to me, but originally, on the left wall, was something similar made of wood - but two separate units.  From left to right on the ceiling was a slide assembly and a set of about 4 climbing ropes were pulled from the left wall to hang down in the centre of the hall. It was always very exciting when we had the opportunity to use that equipment.


The photo below is of me (right) and my brother (left). I endured a certain amount of teasing at school and to be honest, I might have teased myself with that look!



I made a couple of return visits, but never went in. I think it was probably during school holidays when no one was there - or I felt too shy to knock on the door. (The first 3 photos shown above were taken off the school website. The images with the cars were taken by me. The image of kids in the playground may have come from an original version of the school's website).

Going by my [at the time] wife's Astra Belmont, I'd say this visit was around 1999. When I attended the school, the field to the left (the big recky) was only ever used on very hot summer days and sports days. At other times of the year, we played in a smaller field (the little recky) behind the school at the end of the playground area (mentioned later). The green doors to the field were only ever opened on [memorable] special occasions:

 

I took this next photo (below) when I made my second visit. (The inclusion of my car dates this around 1998). This view (minus the flat-roofed porch) is pretty much as I remember things. The far right shows the entrance door to the then top '3rd year' classroom and you can also see the playground leading to the 'little recky' field. Just to the left, behind and out of site, were the outside school toilets. Popular school playground legend, when I was there, said that a witch used to live in the top attic room (small arched window above square window - tallest part of building in the corner). The windows with the pointed tops look into the main hall:


And here's another view in more recent times (from the school's website): 


In July 2008, I was contacted through Friends Reunited by someone else who went to the school and was in my form. I laughed when she started her email with "you probably don't remember me..." since at age 9 I was head over heels in love with her! I will not mention her name, but for those 'in the know' there is a clue in this sentence:


During the course of our correspondence, I sent her a copy of the school photo I had with my brother. She replied with this one:


I couldn't believe we were seated in front of the same bookshelves!

The only other thing that occurred to me, when comparing our photos, was that as an adult, I couldn't see what I saw in her physically. I don't mean that in a horrible way - what I mean is, that as a child, I was in love with her as a whole person.  As an adult, I have grown far more conscious of women who appeal to me visually and not just psychically, so-to-speak. Quite frankly, also comparing our photos, it wouldn't surprise me if she felt the same way!


Wednesday, 5 June 2013

Disappearing Dentist

The day started normally and I left the house just after 11am to go for my yearly dental check-up in Holmfirth.  I parked in my usual car park and walked around the corner to the dentist.  However, when I reached the door, it looked a bit dark inside and a notice on the door declared:

"We have moved"

Well, thanks a bunch for telling me!  Since I am not that familiar with place names in Holmfirth, I wasn't sure where the new address was.  I walked back to the main road and turned towards the town centre.  Coming towards me was (I assumed) a local and I asked him if he knew the new location.  He was as uncertain as I was, but we both thought I was heading in the right direction. 

After a few more steps, and realising it was now 5 minutes before my appointment, I suddenly remembered my mobile.  I phoned up, only to discover that the dentist was now behind me and actually the same distance in the opposite direction to the path I had taken, from their old premises.

An innate sense of direction isn't something I was ever blessed with, so it was no surprise that I intuitively set off in the wrong direction - and don't think I haven't tried playing with this by having this internal conversation:

"Which way shall I go?  I think I should turn left.  That means I should probably go right, since I usually get direction wrong.  But if I turn right instead of left, perhaps I should go left anyway..."

What was actually more interesting to me, was that my dentist had moved.  In terms of spiritual development and law of attraction - and all those things connected with 'creating our own reality', I have to say that at no time, past or present, had I ever entertained any thought or expectation that my dentist would not be where I left it last time!  My complete 'knowing' expectation was that I would arrive at my dentist in the usual way. 

As Spock from the old Star Trek series would say: Fascinating...

Monday, 3 June 2013

Hay House World Summit 2013

Today is the third day of the Hay House World Summit 2013.  I've managed to listen to several of the interviews and taken quite a few notes over the past couple of days. 

If you want to know more, click this link. If you want to listen to interviews with some of the best-known authors and practitioners working with Hay House publishing, check them out. You can see more about the summit in the video clip below:


Due to the amount of material, filling several hours of listening, you may have to be selective on what really interests you. 

Sunday, 26 May 2013

All about Writing and Publishing

Recently, I have been listening to the advice of several people connected with the writing and publishing industries.  These talks have been made possible by Christine Kloser and include the following people:


Christine Kloser's Authors & Experts

If you find this blog in time, you can listen to many of these talks for free until Monday 27 May 2013. Simply go to the website and register for access:

Discover how to become a Hay House author with Reid Tracy.  FREE replay until Monday.  www.TransformationalAuthor.com  #TAE2013

How to write a book proposal… FREE replay with Linda Sivertsen until Monday! www.TransformationalAuthor.com  #TAE2013

How to organize your book content… FREE replay with Fabienne Fredrickson until Monday!   www.TransformationalAuthor.com   #TAE2013

Learn about eBook publishing… FREE replay with Ellen Violette until Monday! www.TransformationalAuthor.com  #TAE2013

Make the most of book industry changes… FREE replay with agent, Bill Gladstone until Monday!   www.TransformationalAuthor.com   #TAE2013

Discover your world-changing story… FREE replay with Gail Larsen until Monday!  www.TransformationalAuthor.com  #TAE2013

You’re right where you’re meant to be… FREE replay with SARK until Monday! www.TransformationalAuthor.com  #TAE2013


From a UK perspective (and in my opinion), the approach and style is quite American, but the advice when you reach it is worth noting down as it applies to anyone anywhere.


Friday, 24 May 2013

It takes 10 years to be an overnight success!

This past week, I've spent quite a few hours listening to interviews with people connected to the publishing world via www.transformationalauthor.com. The title of this post is actually a quote relayed by Hay House President and CEO, Reid Tracy.
 


Once you get through the first 10 to 20 minutes of each session, with everyone saying how wonderful they are, each interview does in fact contain some useful and informative advice on being an author and creating the right conditions for success in publishing, marketing and sales - not to mention the most important aspect of all: developing a following and readership.

One of the main surprises for me, was how much emphasis publishers put on authors to develop the market for their own books.  Various online publishers offer packages for authors and to be honest, all of them seem to offer what I can already do pretty well on my own - yet none of them offer what I really need - help with finding a readership.  So anyway, I now realise that 80% of "marketing" is down to me alone.  Bugger then!

I think it was Alvin Toffler, in his book 'Future Shock', who stated that cultural change in society took 15 years.  Of course, when he wrote this, we didn't have Internet access and the World Wide Web.  I used to be involved with the development of e-learning in education and by the time we got to 2005, I suggested that traditional change time had been reduced to about 5 years.  Now in 2013, I would revise this down to 2 years in many areas of social acceptance of change.  I mention this in relation to the 'overnight success' quote.  It's already been shown that for some people, gaining overnight success has been a reality.  For example, think about some of the 'viral' videos on YouTube, people who have produced amazingly successful Apps for mobile devices, and kids who have suddenly produced a great IT idea from home. 

The real challenge in today's world isn't becoming "famous", it's staying noticed once you have been discovered!  We now live in a transient world where longevity is facing extinction.  Attention spans are shorter and the need for refreshed gratification in everything we experience means that (if you are an individual) trying to come up with and offering something new to the same people is going to burn you out.  Therefore, your most realistic wish should probably be in the area of expansion outwards of your key offerings to reach and touch new people who will embrace them.

Thursday, 23 May 2013

Miracles, Health and Attachment - Articles from 2009

This past week, I've spent quite a few hours listening to interviews with people connected to the publishing world via www.transformationalauthor.com. The title of this post is actually a quote relayed by Hay House President and CEO, Reid Tracy.
 


Once you get through the first 10 to 20 minutes of each session, with everyone saying how wonderful they are, each interview does in fact contain some useful and informative advice on being an author and creating the right conditions for success in publishing, marketing and sales - not to mention the most important aspect of all: developing a following and readership.

One of the main surprises for me, was how much emphasis publishers put on authors to develop the market for their own books.  Various online publishers offer packages for authors and to be honest, all of them seem to offer what I can already do pretty well on my own - yet none of them offer what I really need - help with finding a readership.  So anyway, I now realise that 80% of "marketing" is down to me alone.  Bugger then!

I think it was Alvin Toffler, in his book 'Future Shock', who stated that cultural change in society took 15 years.  Of course, when he wrote this, we didn't have Internet access and the World Wide Web.  I used to be involved with the development of e-learning in education and by the time we got to 2005, I suggested that traditional change time had been reduced to about 5 years.  Now in 2013, I would revise this down to 2 years in many areas of social acceptance of change.  I mention this in relation to the 'overnight success' quote.  It's already been shown that for some people, gaining overnight success has been a reality.  For example, think about some of the 'viral' videos on YouTube, people who have produced amazingly successful Apps for mobile devices, and kids who have suddenly produced a great IT idea from home. 

The real challenge in today's world isn't becoming "famous", it's staying noticed once you have been discovered!  We now live in a transient world where longevity is facing extinction.  Attention spans are shorter and the need for refreshed gratification in everything we experience means that (if you are an individual) trying to come up with and offering something new to the same people is going to burn you out.  Therefore, your most realistic wish should probably be in the area of expansion outwards of your key offerings to reach and touch new people who will embrace them.